Second Realm

Eric P. Rhodes, Artist


Emotional Literacy: A Brief Overview

Emotional literacy, often linked with emotional vocabulary, involves grasping and managing our feelings while recognizing and influencing the emotions of others. This skill set is increasingly valued not just for personal well-being but also for building strong relationships and positive work environments.

A study by Caires et al. (2023) emphasizes the significance of integrating socio-emotional skills in teacher training, showcasing the positive impact of emotional education programs. They argue that emotional literacy benefits personal growth and helps teachers establish empathetic learning spaces (“Promoting Socio-emotional Skills in Initial Teacher Training: An Emotional Educational Programme”, International Journal of Emotional Education, 2023).

In gender studies, Akhavizadegan (2024) explores how traditional masculinity norms can hinder emotional literacy in men, impacting mental health and relationships (“Beyond Men and Masculinity–Exploring the Detrimental Effects of Masculinity and Envisioning a New Paradigm”, Journal of International Women’s Studies, 2024).

Riesco (2021) discusses young adult literature as a tool for enhancing social and emotional literacy among students. She suggests that literature can help young readers navigate emotional complexities, fostering empathy (“Positioning YA Lit as Mentor Texts for Social and Emotional Literacy”, Voices From the Middle, 2021).

Mayer et al. (2011) elaborate on emotional literacy by defining the components of emotional intelligence. They stress the importance of understanding emotions to guide actions, crucial for social interaction and decision-making (“Chapter 26 – Emotional Intelligence”, The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence, 2011).

Lastly, Lindsay et al. (2013) underline the importance of emotional literacy for individuals with intellectual disabilities, advocating for tailored therapies that consider cognitive deficits while enhancing emotional understanding (“Adapting Psychological Therapies for People with Intellectual Disabilities I: Assessment and Cognitive Deficit Considerations”, Psychological Therapies for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, 2013).

In essence, emotional literacy involves managing our emotions and empathizing with others. It goes beyond recognizing feelings to understanding their impact and using that knowledge to shape behaviors and relationships. From education to personal well-being, emotional literacy is a crucial aspect of human intelligence and social interactions, with broad implications for various aspects of life. By nurturing emotional literacy, we can enhance mental health, educational outcomes, and interpersonal connections, underscoring its significance in our daily experiences.


References:

  • Caires, Susana, et al. “Promoting Socio-emotional Skills in Initial Teacher Training: An Emotional Educational Programme.” International Journal of Emotional Education, vol. 15, no. 1, Apr. 2023, pp. 21-33, DOI:10.56300/VCTW9231.
  • Akhavizadegan, Raheleh. “Beyond Men and Masculinity–Exploring the Detrimental Effects of Masculinity and Envisioning a New Paradigm.” Journal of International Women’s Studies, vol. 26, no. 1, Jan. 2024, pp. 1-5.
  • Riesco, Holly Sheppard. “Positioning YA Lit as Mentor Texts for Social and Emotional Literacy.” Voices From the Middle, vol. 28, no. 4, May 2021, pp. 60-64.
  • Mayer, John D., et al. “Chapter 26 – Emotional Intelligence.” The Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence, edited by Robert J. Sternberg and Scott Barry Kaufman, Cambridge University Press, 2011, pp. 528-549.
  • Lindsay, William R., et al. “Adapting Psychological Therapies for People with Intellectual Disabilities I: Assessment and Cognitive Deficit Considerations.” Psychological Therapies for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities, edited by John L. Taylor et al., 1st edition, John Wiley & Sons, 2013, pp. 69-83.

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